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Timber Supply Chain System of Village Use Forest in Lao PDR
By: Rural Research and Development Promoting Knowledge Association (RRDPA)
Published: April 17, 2019
Countries: Laos
Topics: Community Forestry FLEGT
Document type: Briefing note
Document ID: 7715
View count: 11
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Timber Supply Chain System of Village Use Forest in Lao PDR

In the context of Laos, village use forest (VUF) management system has based on both legal system and customary practices. Villagers have rights to harvest and utilize forest resources in village use forest, and forestland surrounding their community farmland. However, harvesting timber from the village use forest and supply timber to the commercial process is not yet allowed by laws. We obtained various legislation and legal framework and gray documents for review. For the case study, two villages in Mahaxay and Yommalat of Khammouane Province were selected. We collected information from staffs of the District Agriculture and Forestry Office (DAFO), and carried out the field survey and conducted groups discussion with village organization’s members and including villagers.

This study highlights the key legislation for unlocking or and allowing VUF for entry into the commercial process should be concerned, reviewed, developed and updated. The monitoring and controlling mechanism should be set and included in the system. It’s functional should not be hampered villagers to benefit from forest resources harvesting. Likewise, the institutional setting and arrangement for VUF should be restructured and strengthened. The VUF timber supply chain should have an appropriate system, eligible for FLEGT license in the near future, and be able to implement by the local villagers and the local authorities in a sustainability manner.

EUTR News – April to June 2019
By: ClientEarth
Published: July 11, 2019
Countries: Other
Topics: - Other - Due Diligence Legislation FLEGT
Document type: - Other -
Document ID: 7682
View count: 29
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EUTR News – April to June 2019

This issue of the EUTR News provides an update on the operation of the EU’s law to address illegal logging, the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR), from April to June 2019. As with all of our previous editions, this issue will include information on what both the European Commission and EU Member States are doing to ensure the proper application of the EUTR, and provide updates on similar legislation internationally.

VPA update, June 2019 – Deepening and expanding multi-stakeholder participation in VPAs to achieve greater impact
By: LoggingOff, Fern
Published: July 10, 2019
Countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, DR Congo, Ghana, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, Laos, Liberia, Myanmar, Republic of Congo, Vietnam
Topics: FLEGT
Document type: Report
Document ID: 7582
View count: 325
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VPA update, June 2019 – Deepening and expanding multi-stakeholder participation in VPAs to achieve greater impact
There is a translation of this document available:

One of the unique features of Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) – which form a key part of the EU’s Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Action Plan – is that they allow a variety of actors (government, private sector, civil society and forest communities) to discuss how forests should be managed. They are the only trade agreements that champion such a bold and innovative approach, and they are therefore seen as a model of multi-stakeholder governance.  

The lesson is clear: forests and peoples are intrinsically linked, so the fate of the former cannot be discussed without the involvement of those who have protected and nurtured them for so long, and many civil society actors have observed a “virtuous circle” regarding civil society and local communities’ participation in VPAs.  

But in many countries, the VPA process is at a crossroads. At this critical time, those moving towards FLEGT licensing should focus on sustaining effective civil society participation. Yet at the same time, efforts cannot be left to timber producing countries alone. The EU and Member States Competent Authorities could also help encourage CSO participation on the demand-side.

Land conversions in Laos: compensating and resettling those affected by infrastructure projects
By: Wifelife Conservation Association
Published: March 20, 2019
Countries: Laos
Topics: Community Forestry FLEGT
Document type: Briefing note
Document ID: 7580
View count: 52
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Land conversions in Laos: compensating and resettling those affected by infrastructure projects

To mitigate poverty and lift the country from its Least Developed Country status by 2020, the  Government of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), has pursued a policy of  developing infrastructure, including creating mines, hydropower dams, telecommunication networks, roads, transmission corridors and Special Economic Zones (SEZs).

Community forestry in the Congo Basin
By: Consortium CoNGOs
Published: April 18, 2019
Countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, DR Congo, Republic of Congo
Topics: Community Forestry
Document type: Blog - opinion piece
Document ID: 7551
View count: 136
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Community forestry in the Congo Basin

How it can support forest peoples, wildlife and the climate

From 2016–2019, Fern was involved in an ambitious project to advance community forestry called ‘NGO collaboration for equitable and sustainable community livelihoods in the Congo Basin forests’.

Marie-Ange Kalenga and Indra van Gisbergen reflect on what has been achieved, Fern’s specific role and what should happen next.


“If local and indigenous communities in the Congo Basin are enabled to manage their forests, they can help restore forests, conserve biodiversity, combat illegal logging, address climate change and secure sustainable livelihoods.”

This, in essence, was the main goal behind the project developed by a vibrant consortium of partners and led by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). The consortium included Rainforest Foundation UK, Client Earth, Tropenbos International, and the Forest Peoples Programme.

The project aimed to raise international and national policymakers’ awareness about the importance of supporting community forest management to keep forests standing and improve forest peoples’ livelihoods. It also trialled alternative models for participatory community forest management in Cameroon, a country that has had a legal community forestry framework for more than 20 years.

Staying within our niche and geographical expertise, Fern’s main responsibility was to increase political support for the development of community forestry, through research, pilots, advocacy and awareness raising. We worked to support partners in Cameroon, Central African Republic and the Republic of Congo, and engaged with policy makers and journalists in the EU and across the Congo Basin.

Photo: Baka women in Nomedjoh, Cameroon, by Indra van Gisbergen.

Community forestry in the Congo Basin

For Fern, community forestry means giving communities control over the forest resources they depend on for their survival, so they can manage them responsibly and inclusively.

In regions like the Congo Basin, communities have protected forests for generations, but they are now being pushed out of their ancestral lands. The causes are mining and increasing demand for wood and commodities such as palm oil, rubber and cocoa, notably for the European Union and China.

This scramble for forests has meant that vast tracts of land have been given to foreign companies or elites and taken from local and indigenous communities.

For it to be truly inclusive, community forestry also needs to pay more attention to the role of women. Our report Community forestry: Opportunity or mirage for women in the Congo Basin? found that women play an important role in forest resource management and conservation due to their dependence on forest resources for subsistence (fuelwood, plants, fruits, herbal medicine among others) and income. Yet, they continue to face discrimination when it comes to decisions about forests. More must be done to improve legislation and strengthen women’s participation in local governance to ensure community forestry benefits everyone.

Photo by Bobulix, Flickr/cc.


Bringing the benefits of Community Forestry to the attention of the EU

Since the start of the CoNGOs project, lessons about what works and recommendations on what should be done have been shared between policy makers, civil society groups and forest communities in all Congo Basin countries and as a result, communities are becoming aware of their rights, and involved in forest management decisions.

This dialogue between policy makers and civil society culminated at the 2017 Meeting of Parties of the Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP) in Douala, Cameroon, attended by several EU Member States including Belgium, France, and Germany, where Fern organised a side event on inclusive forest management in the Congo Basin. The event sparked considerable interest and an agreement that no community should be left behind.

This was an essential meeting as it allowed us to take lessons from Cameroon (a community forestry pioneer) and share them with the wider region. This wider learning was also achieved with the production of videos such as “Community forests in Cameroon: what have we learnt so far?” which looked at the problems as well as the successes achieved in Cameroon.

In November 2018, the Vice-President of the European Parliament Heidi Hautala co-hosted an event with Fern which allowed dialogue between EU institutions, Member States, tropical forested countries and civil society on what the new EU Multi-Annual Financial Framework can do to enhance rural livelihoods in the Congo Basin rainforests. As a result, she became a supporter of communities’ involvement in forest management and we hope to continue working on this issue with the new Parliament when it is elected.

On 29 November Fern and the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) held an event to discuss the impact of the new EU budget on the EU’s commitment to protect forest and local communities’ livelihoods.

Other notable champions that have come forward during the life of the project are the Minister of Forest Economy in the Republic of Congo, Rosalie Matondo who has become an ambassador of participatory forestry (including community forestry) for Central Africa. She has visited neighbouring countries to communicate the importance of both community forestry and strengthening community rights over forest resources.

The emergence of these champions is important for communicating the benefits of community forestry, strengthening dialogue between government and communities, and ultimately sustaining the momentum around participatory management of forests. Thanks to CoNGOs’ awareness raising, in the Central African Republic (CAR) there is, for example, a growing understanding within the Bantu and indigenous communities who sometimes have diverging views over forests, of the importance of working together and improving governance so that forest management is done jointly and in the interest of all. The project also enabled local and indigenous communities in CAR to participate directly in VPA meetings and express their needs, the rights violations they suffer and the community forestry model that would allow them to improve their living conditions.

Community forestry advocates such as Philomène Biya, National Coordinator of Congo’s Réseau Femmes Africaines pour le Développement Durable explained why such work is important. In all of the countries, communities are closely linked to forest ecosystems as they depend on them for food, habitat, medicines, and cultural and social rights.

Denying them access and control over forests is depriving them of the fundamental right to exist. Whereas when they are given strong rights over forests they have been shown to protect and preserve them, thereby benefiting biodiversity and the climate.

“Communities need to gain back the rights to their forests to achieve stronger livelihoods and improve the health of the planet”.

In Cameroon, the Centre for Environmental Development (CED) worked with communities in the villages of Nomedjoh and Nkolenyeng in the South East to develop a revised simple management plan in a participatory and inclusive way reflecting community needs and aspirations. The participatory process was captured in a guide which is now used by communities across the country who are interested in establishing sustainable community forestry. In Nomedjoh, the Ministry of Forests’ approval of their management plan has empowered a community to keep their forest standing while carrying out non-logging activities for the next five years.

As for the Republic of Congo, there has been an ‘in principle’ agreement to create pilot community forests in the Sangha region, where people will implement forestry that meets their needs and aspirations.

Our awareness raising and advocacy work was supported by videos such as:

Thanks to our fruitful collaboration, the European Commission has committed to supporting community forestry projects in the Congo Basin and there is even hope that community forestry will form a growing part of the implementation of the Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPA) in the Congo Basin. The European Parliament has also become a more forceful supporter of forests and communities. Its ground-breaking report on natural resource management, the case of forests asks for stronger participation of local communities in forest management.

The CoNGOs project partners discuss a new paradigm for community forestry at the 17th annual Meeting of Parties of the Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP) in Douala.


Next steps

Fern and its local partners are motivated to continue supporting community forestry, even after the completion of the CoNGOs project, to help get their voices heard.

Fern will continue to work with DFID and other donors to promote community forestry and foster dialogue between civil society, national governments and the EU. We hope to garner support for the Brazzaville Roadmap for more effective participatory forestry in Central Africa which we helped develop together with our local partners and the UN Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO). The roadmap paves the way for more resilient forests and communities in the Congo Basin and could be instrumental in ensuring that benefits from forestry reach the most vulnerable. Such work will also help us achieve international commitments such as the Paris Climate Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals, but only if we can garner resources and political support.

When forests are at risk, so are the communities and the climate. If well implemented, community forestry can help protect them all.

Photo: Mayombe Massive, Congo, by Jbdodane, Flickr/cc.

The Laos-EU Voluntary Partnership Agreement: Laos Civil Society Takes Stock
By: Fern
Published: June 17, 2019
Countries: Laos
Topics: FLEGT
Document type: Briefing note
Document ID: 7544
View count: 104
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The Laos-EU Voluntary Partnership Agreement: Laos Civil Society Takes Stock

This briefing outlines Civil Society’s involvement in the EU-Laos Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Voluntary Partnership Agreement (VPA). It explains how their engagement is influencing the content, improving forest governance and offering opportunities previously closed to them.

Lao CSO FLEGT network members (June 2019)
By: Lao CSO FLEGT network
Published: June 17, 2019
Countries: Laos
Topics: FLEGT
Document type: - Other -
Document ID: 7541
View count: 99
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Lao CSO FLEGT network members (June 2019)
COMMUNIQUE ISSUED BY FOREST WATCH GHANA (FWG)
By: Civic Response
Published: June 3, 2019
Countries: Ghana
Topics: - Other - Community Forestry Community Rights FLEGT
Document type: Press release
Document ID: 7497
View count: 264
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COMMUNIQUE ISSUED BY FOREST WATCH GHANA (FWG)

Members of Forest Watch Ghana (FWG), a coalition of 32 non-governmental organisations and individuals in Ghana, having met at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) from 26th to 30th of March, 2019, in Accra issued this communique after having considered and discussed some crucial issues within the country’s forestry sector, including: the gradual conversion of the Kalakpa Nature Reserve from a Wildlife Protected Area to a logging hub; the need for consolidating the laws of the forestry sector; conversion of Globally Significant Biodiversity Areas (GSBAs) to logging areas; the on-going tree tenure reforms; the resurgence of illegal mining vis-a-vis the recent exposé on galamsey by Tiger Eye PI, the ace investigative journalism organisation; and the rather low appreciation for ecosystems/biodiversity services and values by the general populace.

A Decade Later-Time for a new approach to Community Forestry in Liberia
By: Sustainable Development Institute Liberia (SDI)
Published: May 31, 2019
Countries: Liberia
Topics: Community Forestry Community Rights Independent Forest Monitoring (IFM)
Document type: Briefing note
Document ID: 7494
View count: 135
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A Decade Later-Time for a new approach to Community Forestry in Liberia

This Policy Brief argues for an approach that situates forest and forest resources at the center of sustainable development efforts in forest communities. It proposes, for example that community forestry should be oriented towards social empowerment and community-owned enterprise development, and move away from the rent-seeking approach in which communities look to logging companies because they promise jobs, roads, schools, clinics, and clean water

EUTR News – March 2018 to March 2019
By: ClientEarth
Published: April 30, 2019
Countries: Other
Topics: - Other - Due Diligence Legislation FLEGT
Document type: - Other -
Document ID: 7464
View count: 202
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EUTR News – March 2018 to March 2019
There are translations of this document available:

In March 2019, the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) had its 6-year anniversary.

The need to strengthen efforts to better implement the EUTR was underlined by the European Commission in its biennial report on EUTR implementation published in October 2018. Although the report shows that there has been significant progress in EUTR enforcement in Member States, uneven implementation is still a problem.

The deficiencies in EUTR implementation were highlighted in many NGO reports indicating that there are serious concerns that illegally harvested timber has been placed on the EU market. A Global Witness report focuses on timber imports from the Democratic Republic of Congo, EIA investigations revealed that illegally harvested timber from Myanmar might have been exported to the EU, Earthsight reported on irregularities related to timber trade with Ukraine.

EUTR Expert Group meetings hosted by the European Commission focused on the problem of risks related to timber imports from Myanmar, Brazil and Ukraine. The topic of forest governance in Ukraine became a subject of international debate after the publication of an Earthsight report, which was further discussed at the 28th Global Forum on Forest Governance at Chatham House.

Discussions were also held in relation to the product scope of the EUTR. Although the European Commission ran a consultation on this issue in early 2018, so far no proposal to amend the product scope has been made.

In order to make forestry laws more accessible, ClientEarth launched the ‘Forest Logbook’ which provides information on legal regulations regarding forestry in EU Member States and globally.